About
 

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.

 

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.

 

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.

Dan’s guitar playing is an eclectic blend of everything he has listened to and studied – jazz, rock, world music from other cultures and countries – youll find it all in his playing. James Sallis, in the book THE GUITAR IN JAZZ writes, Dan Lamberts playing is highly individualistic – sometimes relaxed and in a groove, often full of stabbing odd turns – and immediately recognizable.
You’ll here guitar, sarod, ruan and oud at Dan Lambert performances. Most of the times he’s accompanied by Mexican percussionist Ricardo Amaya and, depending on the venue, percussionists Erik Hickerson or Mauricio Gonzalez may be along for the ride

Lately the show has been focusing on Dan’s original compositions showcased on the new Dan Lambert The Double Drum Trio CD. Wadi A Go Go, India Long Distanceand Oud Player’s Lament are hot one’s from the new one. The classics from earlier CDs are there also, with names like If Dogs Wore Hats, Tartan Swing, Howling Wilderness, Used To Be Such A Nice Boy, and Into It, along with arrangements of all sorts of music – the Zombies’ Time of the Season and She’s Not There, a bunch of Beatles tunes, jazz standards like Autumn Leaves, Fly Me To The Moon, How High The Moon, and Take Five, Carole King’s Its Too Late, Van Morrison’s Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl, the list goes on forever. Lately Chicago’s25 or 6 to 4 has been getting a run through onstage, as well as the Mission Impossible theme along with The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

In January, 2004, Dan went on a playing trip to London that included 5 dates, one at the Windsor Platfest. A story about the shows was featured in WHATS UP, a southwest entertainment weekly, in February. Dan now writes an entertaining monthly music column,The Final Note, for WHAT’S UP.